Can Unfriendly Bacteria Make You Fat?

What You’ll Learn:

  • There are specific bacteria, present in certain foods, that leads to obesity.
  • The importance of having a healthy instestinal flora, and including fermented and bitter foods for good nutrition.
  • How pre- and pro-biotics can help.

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43 comments on “Can Unfriendly Bacteria Make You Fat?
  1. PennyB says:

    I read in Mark Hyman's blog that restless leg syndrome can be a symptom of bad gut bacteria. He also mentioned weight gain as a result of toxins produced by bad bugs in the gut.

    "Other similar studies have found that clearing out overgrowth of bad bugs with a non-absorbed antibiotic can be an effective treatment for restless leg syndrome(vi) and fibromyalgia.(vii)

    Even obesity has been linked to changes in our gut ecosystem that are the result of a high-fat, processed, inflammatory diet. Bad bugs produce toxins called lipopolysaccardies (LPS) that trigger inflammation and insulin resistance or pre-diabetes and thus promote weight gain.(viii)"

  2. Julia says:

    Hi Diana. Welcome to the GM support group.

    A quick suggestion for you... you could make coconut yoghurt (then there would be no dairy). There is a recipe at https://members.thegabrielmethod.com/friendly-bacteria/ just see the first comment.

    Julia

  3. Jal Mahimwala says:

    Thanks Jon for this information. I have just started your programme about a week ago and I am a vegan so i don't have the yogurt; and the other food probiotics that you suggested are not available where i live in Mumbai. Is it alright to just take probiotic capsules and how many should i take in a day. What about digestive enzymes..... do they come in capsule form?? And how many do i take of that too.???. Thanks Diana

  4. Nicole Lafontaine says:

    Thank you, Jon, for this astounding information.
    I believe I have this problem and it gives me sugar cravings. What I do when the cravins happen, I take hot water with apple cider vinegar, it helps a lot. I am even getting used to the taste 😉 .

    I would love more information about the type of diet (recommended foods) you are talking about in this video.
    Does it not mean avoiding sugars also ?
    That makes me fell like dieting AGAIN.
    I so much prefer the idea of adding good food.

  5. Celia Bassett says:

    I have a major issue with some foods causing immediate burning/acid reflex that lasts for hours, e.g. bread, pasta, potatoes, bought packaged/junk foods. When I avoid these things the burning sensation is much less. But sometimes it will be from fruits too. I have started taking probiotics morning and night for the past 3 weeks. I haven't noticed any difference yet but realise that it is a long term process. When I asked at the Health Shop regarding digestive enzymes I was told that they would be too harsh on my spleen. Why do you think these would this be a problem? thanks

    • Jon Gabriel says:

      Hi Celia,

      All of the items on your list cause digestive problems, insulin resistance and weight problems as well. Most people don't notice the digestive issues, but you're digestion is obviously very sensitive. I think the digestive enzymes would be perfect for you. Finding creative alternatives to all the items you mentioned would also be great too.

  6. Linda Fortnam says:

    Just a side note, try ordering a Boostaroo amplifier for low audio. They are inexpensive but work well and good for all kinds of uses besides your computer. I use it in my car for the DVD player for the kids, as well as when I fly to hear over the engine noise. Their site is boostaroo.com.

    I was wondering if Kombuchu would work as the fermented food. I like that but not Kimchee or saurkraut. Do we need a variety of fermented foods? How often do you recommend we add these?

  7. Sharon Walker says:

    I have been delving into your program now for two months and must need help because I am not loosing weight. I know I have many challenges as I have all the 9 fat program on probably. I had to take antibiotics three times the first month also. I use the meditations morning and evening and get a huge amount from them. I also have spinal stenosis and use the visualizations as part of my spine's care. I have had my appendix and my gall bladder out and a hysterectomy. Everything you say that turns on fat programs. I have added more good foods to my diet and still love sugar and dessert. I really believe your program is right on for me and wonder what I can choose to move into more. Thank you

  8. Catherine Passever says:

    Also Jon, is it possible to record louder videos ? Thank you.
    cati

  9. Catherine Passever says:

    kimchi is great and not so difficult to make.
    I wonder about yoghourt. Is it always good? cow milk or goat milk the same?
    thank you for your suggestions
    cati

  10. Catherine says:

    Hi Jon, I have started seeing a Naturopath, and she believes my intestine could not benefit for enzymes and probiotics yet because it is not functioning well from over use of antibiotics, is this true, I thought they could always help in some way? Ta...Catherine

    • Jean Railton says:

      That does not make sense to me. If your digestion is not working well due to over use of antibiotics it is really important to take probiotics to recolonise your intestines with good bacteria. And digestive enzymes help the enterocytes digest the food.

    • Patricia Eichhorn says:

      Catherine, I definitely agree with Jean.

      A doctor misdiagnosed my issue and had me on 7 kinds of antibiotics in a week and a half. When he prescribed the 8th, a super antibiotic, I found a different doctor and discovered I did not need antibiotics. This was years ago, before there was much information available about probiotics. Now, I suggest probiotics to friends who are coming off antibiotics and they are astonished at the improvements in digestion and energy level.

      Some medical doctors are becoming enlightened enough to tell their patients to start the probiotics before the round of antibiotics is over.

    • Jon Gabriel says:

      Hi Catherine,

      Some health experts say you should wait till after you're finished taking antibiotics, before you start taking probiotics, but I don't agree. I think it's all the more reason to give your digestion as much help as possible.

    • Patricia Eichhorn says:

      Catherine, I forgot to tell you that you may get diarrhea when you first start on probiotics. Did not happen to me, but did happen to a friend of mine. I was told it was caused by the large number of critters dying off, but I cannot verify that statement. Hmm. Could it be because of the specific kind of probiotics my friend was using?

      Does anyone on the forum have an answer?

    • h says:

      Hi Catherine, interesting point. Probiotic should help. very interesting fact about unhealthy bacteria, as a kid and young adult was on courses of antibiotics for years, it wasnt until my mother took me to a herbalist did my condition change. but all these years on antibiotics can you get your system back up and working correctly? Can herbal teas help?

  11. Julia says:

    I have a question re probiotics. I'm low income and can't afford a probiotic supplement. But I have one of those Easiyo makers that allows me to make yoghurt at home much cheaper than shop bought. I usually make Greek yoghurt and put a little stevia in it with some Coles canned blueberries... weirdly enough the Coles brand of canned blueberries have NO additives, the ingredient list says simply: blueberries, water and sugar.

    My question is, would this yoghurt be better for me than branded yoghurt. I know it has the live cultures and it hasn't been pasteurized like most branded yoghurts so there are MORE live cultures available. I have considered buying organic cultures and making them in the unit using organic milk which of course would be even healthier.

    • Julia says:

      Oh, I should say that 14 months ago when I first did your fat program trigger quiz, digestion was my largest issue (scoring 14 out of 18). Interestingly, when I did it again a couple of months ago my digestion scored a 6 with all the changes I've made adding live foods and their digestive enzymes, omega 3, healthy flora etc.

      I've been avoiding eating brown onion for ages because within an hour it USED to give me excruciating stomach cramps. I can now eat it without a problem. As I can also eat salmon and tuna without suffering reflux from it like it used to.

    • Jon Gabriel says:

      Hi Julie,

      Home made yoghurt should have more live, healthy bacteria than most store bought brands. However with the blueberries, can you buy fresh or frozen instead? Blueberries are already pretty sweet. Adding sugar to them can cause a blood sugar spike.

      • Julia says:

        I do have frozen blueberries. The fresh ones are very expensive right now ($8 for a tiny punnet).

        I should probably also add some chia seeds to the yoghurt for the omega 3.

  12. Anne Stevens says:

    I make my own kefir water at home. It is very easy but you do have to tend it every day or two. We use it in morning smoothies and frequently have some more around 2 or 3 with a spoonful of cider vinegar, spring water and organic juice and a pinch of cinnamon. The kefir tastes a bit like weak champagne so not too bad. It just gives you a gentle energy lift with no caffeine buzz and doesn't drop you off later. You feel great for hours. I used to have a cola habit, now I don't even miss the cola. My daughter uses the kefir water on her babies diaper rash. It works well there, too. We also make our own sauerkraut with cabbage, kale, carrots, apples. It is delicious on steamed veggies or eggs. It is also easy to make.

  13. Julie Niemeyer says:

    Jon mentioned bitter foods and Fermented foods, I have a quic klist od bitter foods:
    Common bitter foods and beverages include coffee, unsweetened cocoa, South American mate, marmalade, bitter gourd, beer (due to hops), bitters, olives, citrus peel, many plants in the Brassicaceae family, dandelion greens, wild chicory, and escarole. Quinine is also known for its bitter taste and is found in tonic water.

    Fermented food list:
    Aged cheese, Beer, Crème fraiche, Kefir, Sake, Sauerkraut, Sourdough Bread, Sprouted foods, Thai fish sauce, Tofuyo
    Traditionally fermented pickled vegetables: capers, olives, pickles
    Traditionally fermented soy products: miso, tempeh, traditionally brewed soy sauce
    Traditionally marinated vegetables: artichokes, olives, peppers, mushrooms, Umeboshi plums, Vinegar, Wine, Yogurt

    • Patricia Eichhorn says:

      Thank you.

    • Jon Gabriel says:

      Hi Julie,

      Great list. I would delete Creme Fraiche, Beer and sourdough bread. Not to say you should avoid these items at all cost, but the downside of each of them overrides the benefits of the healthy bacteria. So eat them if you crave them but NOT because they have friendly bacteria. Does that make sense?

  14. Julie Niemeyer says:

    In the paper it said the subject was fed a diet of diet of whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods and prebiotics.

    Here is a link to a list of Whole Grain Foods: http://wholegrainscouncil.org/whole-grains-101/whole-grains-a-to-z

    Here is a link to Traditional Chinese Medicinal foods:
    http://www.tcminter.net/Artikel/Dietetics.htm
    http://www.shen-nong.com/eng/lifestyles/tcmrole_obesityweight_methods_chifoodtherapy.html
    These two links above are a bit difficult to achive, but information is good to have.

    Here’s a list of some of the food that contain the highest amount of Prebiotics:
    Grains: Oatmeal, Barley, Wheat, Rye, Vegetables, Jerusalem artichokes, Tomatoes, Bananas, Kale, Mustard greens, Dandelion greens, Chicory root, Onions, Garlic
    Fruits: Bananas, Apples, Blackberries, Raspberries, Blueberries, Cranberries, Raisins, Kiwi Fruit
    Legumes: Lentils, Black beans, Kidney beans, Chickpeas, Split peas
    Dairy products: Yogurt, Cheese, Goat’s milk
    Other: Honey

  15. Julie Niemeyer says:

    I used to brew my owm Kombucha Tea, my culture is gone now, I also tried making my owm Kefir. I really like the Kombucha, the Kefir not so much. I never really cared for sourkraut or Kimchi. Those are the things that come to mind. I think I am going to see what I can find on this topic.

  16. Catherine Bell says:

    This makes so much sense and aligns with what we intuitively know when we have eaten something that we can feel in our gut is not digesting with transparency. Maintaining a healthy gut requires thinking about we put in our mouth and then combating our environment and life stresses by regularly taking high quality probiotics and enzymes.

    Thank you for sharing the recent study results. I am so enthused with all that Gabriel Method makes available on the internet and I am beginning to see and feel the emotional, spiritual, and physical benefits in spades. Thank you.

  17. Leslie Colquhoun says:

    wow; I think this is really important because I know there is something wrong with my digestion and there has been for some time. I've actually gotten so I can't eat anything without getting diareha. Jon, can you be more specific about the types of foods you are referring to as wall as the kinds of pro/pre biotics needed.
    thanks for being there.

    • Patricia Eichhorn says:

      Leslie, I had diarrhea for almost eight years until I discovered it was caused by any kind of red food dye. As I moved away from processed foods with dyes, the diarrhea cleared up on its own. Actually, it cleared up immediately, but every time I fell back and ate food containing dyes, my body reacted quickly.
      Good luck on your search for health.

    • Jon Gabriel says:

      Sure Leslie,

      Live greens and juices made from live greens.
      Fruit
      yoghurt and kefir made from sheep and goat's milk or coconut milk.
      Activated nuts and seeds
      nut cheeses
      fermented soy products, such as miso, tempeh and tamari
      apple cider vinegar
      fermented vegetables, like pickles
      sourkraut and kim chi
      raw milk
      aged cheeses (preferably unpasteurized)
      sprouts
      fermented super greens
      probiotics and digestive enzymes.
      Hope this helps...

      Jon

    • Pauline Callaghan says:

      Have you been tested for celiac disease, Leslie?

  18. Tracy Ocepek says:

    What are the best fermented foods to eat?